Tuesday, March 29, 2011

Moon Magick and its Correspondences (Simplified)




New Moon Magic:
New Moon workings can be done from the day of the new moon to three-and-a-half days after.
The new moon is for starting new ventures, new beginnings.
Also love and romance, health or job hunting.

Waxing Moon Magic:
From seven to fourteen days after the new moon.
The waxing moon is for constructive magic, such as love, wealth, success,
courage, friendship, luck or health.

Full Moon Magic:
From fourteen to seventeen-and-a-half days after the new moon.
Prime time for rituals for prophecy, protection, divination.
Any working that needs extra power, such as help finding a new job or healings for
serious conditions, can be done now.
Also, love, knowledge, legal undertakings, money and dreams.

Waning Moon Magic:
From three-and-a-half to ten-and-a-half days after the full moon.
The waning moon is used for banishing magic, for ridding oneself of addictions, illness or negativity.


Dark Moon Magic:
From ten-and-a-half to fourteen days after the full moon.
The dark moon is a time for dealing with attackers, for exploring our darkest recesses and understanding our angers and passions. Also bringing justice to bear.

Saturday, March 26, 2011

Why salt is used for protection and cleansing

Few elements have had a longer importance in human cultures as regular table salt, both mined stone salt and sea salt has been the prime tool for preserving foods and adding flavor even long before recorded history. Salt also played an important role in many religions and faiths, it was considered one of the prime elements in the European medieval alchemy and therefore essential for the making of the philosophers stone. In Christianity salt is also a religious symbol. Salt is a symbol of the sanctity of Jesus, as a preserving value of his sanctity and, protection it is used to make holy water in the Roman Catholic Church. 

Salt as a sign of bad omens. According to some recollections salt was spilled by Judas Iscariot at the last supper, and since then is seen as a sign of omen and bad luck. If you spilled salt you could avert your bad luck by tossing a pinch of salt over your left shoulder, which was thought to be the devils side. By doing this one would advert any evils that the devils lurking at your left side had in store for you.


In many pagan rituals salt was also important, it is used in magical spells, cleansing rituals, charms and concoctions, and already in ancient Pre-christian Rome salt were a symbol of friendship and spilling of salt, a symbol of ill luck. Later with Christianity a deep faith and salt as a symbol of Jesus, one assumed at the pagan witch sabbath everything was salt free.

In Norse mythology they thought that the gods came from a salty ice-block as the cow, Auðumblabrought  Búri the first god in Norse mythology, grandfather of Odin, out of the salty ice block over the course of four days. In general, other than its role as part of Norse creation myths salt had little importance other than a tool used to preserve and condition foods, though later Christianity brought in a lot of their beliefs in salt.

In Hawaii and Samoa sea salt is used for protection both by placing salt in each of the four corners of the house and by poring salt on the door threshold to prevent any spirits from crossing into ones home.

Wednesday, March 23, 2011

Fundamentals of Buddhism- FASCINATING!



(shared by Cindy Wong)


1. There is no almighty God in Buddhism. There is no one to hand out rewards or punishments on a supposedly Judgement Day.

2. Buddhism is strictly not a religion in the context of being a faith and worship owing allegiance to a supernatural being.

3. No saviour concept in Buddhism. A Buddha is not a saviour who saves others by his personal salvation. Although a Buddhist seeks refuge in the Buddha as his incomparable guide who indicates the path of purity, he makes no servile surrender. A Buddhist does not think that he can gain purity merely by seeking refuge in the Buddha or by mere faith in Him. It is not within the power of a Buddha to wash away the impurities of others

4. A Buddha is not an incarnation of a god/God (as claimed by some Hindu followers). The relationship between a Buddha and his disciples and followers is that of a teacher and student.

5. The liberation of self is the responsibility of one's own self. Buddhism does not call for an unquestionable blind faith by all Buddhist followers. It places heavy emphasis on self-reliance, self discipline and individual striving.

6. Taking refuge in The Triple Gems i.e. the Buddha, the Dharma and the Sangha; does not mean self-surrender or total reliance on an external force or third party for help or salvation.

7. Dharma (the teachings in Buddhism) exists regardless whether there is a Buddha. Sakyamuni Buddha (as the historical Buddha) discovered and shared the teachings/ universal truths with all sentient beings. He is neither the creator of such teachings nor the prophet of an almighty God to transmit such teachings to others.

8. Especially emphasized in Mahayana Buddhism, all sentient beings have Buddha Nature/ Essence. One can become a Buddha (a supreme enlightened being) in due course if one practises diligently and attains purity of mind (ie absolutely no delusions or afflictions).

9. In Buddhism, the ultimate objective of followers/practitioners is enlightenment and/or liberation from Samsara; rather than to go to a Heaven (or a deva realm in the context of Buddhist cosmology).

10. Karma and Karma Force are cornerstones in Buddhist doctrines. They are expounded very thoroughly in Buddhism. Karma refers to an important metaphysical concept concerned with action and its consequences. This law of karma explains the problem of sufferings, the mystery of the so-called fate and predestination of some religions, and above all the apparent inequality of mankind.

11. Rebirth is another key doctrine in Buddhism and it goes hand in hand with karma. There is a subtle difference between rebirth and reincarnation as expounded in Hinduism. Buddhism rejects the theory of a transmigrating permanent soul, whether created by a god or emanating from a divine essence. 

12. Maitri or Metta in Pali (Loving Kindness) and Karuna (Compassion) to all living beings including animals. Buddhism strictly forbids animal sacrifice for whatever reason. Vegetarianism is recommended but not compulsory.

13. The importance of Non-attachment. Buddhism goes beyond doing good and being good. One must not be attached to good deeds or the idea of doing good; otherwise it is just another form of craving.

14. In Buddhism, there is consideration for all sentient beings (versus human beings, as in other religions). Buddhists acknowledge/accept the existence of animals and beings in other realms in Samsara.

15. No holy war concept in Buddhism. Killing is breaking a key moral precept in Buddhism. One is strictly forbidden to kill another person in the name of religion, a religious leader or whatsoever religious pretext or worldly excuse.

16. Suffering is another cornerstone in Buddhism. It is the first of the Four Noble Truths. Sufferings are very well analysed and explained in Buddhism.

17. The idea of sin or original sin has no place in Buddhism. Also, sin should not be equated to suffering.

18. Buddhist teachings expound no beginning and no end to one's existence or life. There is virtually no recognition of a first cause — e.g. how does human existence first come about?

19. The Dharma provides a very detailed explanation of the doctrine of anatman {anatta in Pali} or soullessness , i.e. there is no soul entity (whether in one life of many lives).

20. The Buddha is omniscient but he is not omnipotent. He is capable of innumerable feats but there are three things he cannot do. Also, a Buddha does not claim to be a creator of lives or the Universe.

21. Prajna [Panna in Pali] or Transcendent Wisdom occupies a paramount position in Buddhist teachings. Sakyamuni Buddha expounded Prajna concepts for some 20 years of his ministry. One is taught to balance compassion with prajna i.e.emotion (faith) with rationale (right understanding / truth / logic). 

22. The tradition and practice of meditation in Buddhism are relatively important and strong. While all religions teach some forms or variations of stabilising/single-pointedness meditation, only Buddhism emphazises Vipassana (Insight) meditation as a powerful tool to assist one in seeking liberation/enlightenment.

23. The doctrine of Sunyata or Emptiness is unique to Buddhism and its many aspects are well expounded in advanced Buddhist teachings. Briefly, this doctrine asserts the transcendental nature of Ultimate Reality. It declares the phenomenal world to be void of all limitations of particularization and that all concepts of dualism are abolished.

24. Conditioned Arising [Paticcasamuppada in Pali] or Dependent Origination is another key doctrine in Buddhism. This doctrine explains that all psychological and physical phenomena constituting individual existence are interdependent and mutually condition each other; this at the same time describes what entangles sentient beings in samsara.

25. The concept of Hell(s) in Buddhism is very different from that of other religions. It is not a place for eternal damnation as viewed by 'almighty creator' religions. In Buddhism, it is just one of the six realms in Samsara [i.e. the worst of three undesirable realms]. Also, there are virtually unlimited number of hells in the Buddhist cosmology as there are infinite number of Buddha worlds.

26. The Buddhist cosmology (or universe) is distinctly different from that of other religions which usually recognise only this solar system (Earth) as the centre of the Universe and the only planet with living beings. The Buddhist viewpoint of a Buddha world (also known as Three Thousand-Fold World System) is that of one billion solar systems. Besides, the Mahayana Buddhist doctrines expound that there are other contemporary Buddha worlds like Amitabha's Pure Land and Bhaisajyaguru's world system.

27. Samsara is a fundamental concept in Buddhism and it is simply the 'perpetual cycles of existence' or endless rounds of rebirth among the six realms of existence. This cyclical rebirth pattern will only end when a sentient being attains Nirvana, i.e. virtual exhaustion of karma, habitual traces, defilements and delusions. All other religions preach one heaven, one earth and one hell, but this perspective is very limited compared with Buddhist samsara where heaven is just one of the six realms of existence and it has 28 levels/planes.

[ Compiled by Tan Swee Eng]

Monday, March 21, 2011

VIRGO - August 24th - September 22nd

Symbol: The Virgin
“She has a tongue which charms, a mastery of words, and not so much wealth as the impulse to investigate the causes and effects of things.” (Manilius, 1st Century)

The true origins of the name are unknown, but Virgo has most often been associated with the symbol of a virgin, or specifically the Virgin Mary. As the sixth sign of the zodiac, Virgo is known not only as the god of fertility, but of agriculture too, as its sign falls in harvest time."

Star-stone: Sardonyx

Sardonyx is a member of the quartz family which comes in a wide variety of colours. There has been little written about its properties in relation to the zodiac, but those that believe in crystals as an aid for well being use and sell Sardonyx. It is known in these circles to increase stamina and self confidence, and thus giving the wearer an optimistic view of life.

A Virgo likes routine, which enables them to be practical and industrious workers. They are also very good at absorbing information. On a personal level, Virgo’s are at their happiest when looking out for other people.

Virgo’s can also be mistaken for introverts, as they are very shy and modest, partly due to an awareness of their own short-comings. Although modesty is a known aphrodisiac, few Virgo’s will react to any love interest without some self doubt.
The negative side to their character can also find them too conservative, and weighed down by the details of a project.


For centuries the zodiac elements have been used to describe basic personality traits in human nature, and this can be quite accurate in predicting which star signs will be most compatible. Virgo’s are known for their dependable natures and it’s this trait they look for in others.They will find this in the other earth signs, (Taurus and Capricorn). The water signs of Pisces, Scorpio, and Cancer are also compatible with earth signs. The nature of earth signs means they are often ‘guiding’ water signs towards achieving their goals, while in turn, water signs can help mold or release emotions in an earth sign.

Saturday, March 5, 2011

One of the Oldest castles in Ireland to stay- And yes, there are ghosts!!!

Smarmore Castle- Ardee Ireland

Smarmore Castle has been described as one of the top five places to sleep in Meath and Louth in the current edition of the Lonely Planet guidebook. This guide describes the castle as follows:
“One part medieval fortress and one part luxurious country home, this 14 th-century castle has been converted into a very smart boutique hotel. The six rooms, from the four-postered Viscount’s room in the castle tower to the family-friendly Count’s room, all offer a range of experiences, from courtly Knight to country gent. There’s also a pretty decent fitness centre on the premises. It is situated 6km south of Ardee.”






This is the Earl's Room- Very cozy during the day with views out the front lawn and courtyard/paddock.  Now at night, some very noisy and active ghosties got my attention--- EVERY NIGHT FOR A WEEK STRAIGHT!!  I shared this room with Dr. Ethel Linville (Atlanta, GA) who can corroborate all my tales.
click the link blow to see more of the castle-




Ireland Castle Accommodation - Louth Accommodation

Friday, March 4, 2011

The New Moon and its significance

It seems Earth's Moon has been worshiped since the beginning of time. Its powerful pull on the Earth  affects weather, tides in our oceans. Many believe since the human body is made up of 80% water, then we as flora and fauna are also under its gravitational influence.

The New Moon is when the sky is at its darkest- you cannot see the moon from the Earth and this happens every 28 days.  Because the sky is void of it's largest nighttime luminary, people make decisions on what they want to cast off. Individuals use rituals, say prayers, or execute plans of action.  

The best cliche I can use to reinforce this point is;
"Out with the old, in with the NEW."  

(This saying is a reference to the moon phases in case you didn't already know.)

I say-" When the moon is away, my new life starts today!"

Personally, I make a mental list leading up to the new moon, and think about what negative aspects are in my life that I would like to cast off to beyond all space and time- then start on a course for changes when the moon is not in the sky.  

This is a good exercise for those who like being mindful or present in their life each day.  Junk can accumulate and weigh us down.  It is nice to know at night if there is no moon in the sky, you are reminded to empty the trash in your lives as well.  At the same time new opportunities need to be considered.  The New Moon is when you make statements on how your life should be, where you want to attract personal growth and gain something in your life both tangible and intangible.

Listed are some things people do when the moon is "New."
- look for lost items
- start a new relationship or romance
- change hair color, or style
- buy a new house 
fix your car 
buy clothes 
- bring home a new pet (animals are the easiest to handle during this moon phase)
- get a loan
- hire an employee

********************************************************************************************************
Farmers/Gardeners can use this rule of thumb during a new moon-to a waxing moon

Transplanting-  trees, bushes, or seedlings

Planting crops/flowers that grow above the soil

Remember, the New Moon is used for personal growth, healing, the blessing of a new project.


Wednesday, March 2, 2011

Save Our National Parks! - Take Action Today @ The Hunger Site

Save Our National Parks! - Take Action Today @ The Hunger Site

HOW THE MONTHS GOT THEIR NAMES

This is a very interesting exercise in that many of us forgot that grade school Latin class when we learned the names of the months, or when we studied History, English, and Mythology in school, the stories of  Roman Gods were told. 


In Art, Literature, and History, western Civilization went by the Roman Julian Calendar for over 1500 years.  We can accurately convert Roman dates after 58 BC relative to the start of the Julian calendar, precursor to the Gregorian calendar (1582) that we use today.


We can start getting comfortable with dialog about Metaphysics by talking about something as mundane as the names of months.  No one can argue that beliefs in Pagan Gods/Goddesses are wicked or negatively label the subject, when they themselves use these words in the Western World everyday.


We can accurately convert Roman dates after 58 BC relative to the start of the Julian calendar, precursor to the Gregorian calendar (1582) that we use today.


Enjoy- Mimi

JANUARY
Named for the Roman God Janus, he was considered protector of gates and doorways. Janus is depicted with two faces, one looking into the past, the other facing the future. Janus is the God of new beginnings.


FEBRUARY
From the Latin word februa, meaning "to cleanse." The Roman Februalia was a month of purification and atonement.

MARCH
Named for the Roman God of war, Mars. This was the time of year to resume military campaigns that had been interrupted by winter.

APRIL
From the Latin word aperio, "to open (bud)," because plants begin to grow in this month.

MAY
Named for the Roman Goddess Maia, who oversaw the growth of plants. Also from the Latin word maiores, "elders," who were celebrated during this month.

JUNE
Named for the Roman Goddess Juno, patroness of marriage and the general well-being of women. The word is also derived from the Latin word juvenis, meaning young people.

JULY
Named to honor Julius Caesar (100 B.C.– 44 B.C.). In 46 B.C., Julius Caesar made one of his greatest contributions to history with the development of the Julian calendar, the precursor to the Gregorian calendar we use today.

AUGUST
Named to honor the First Roman emperor,(and grandnephew of Julius Caesar), Augustus Caesar lived from(63 B.C.– A.D. 14).

SEPTEMBER
From the Latin word septem, "seven," because this had been the seventh month of the early Roman calendar before Julius Caesar's calendar reform.

OCTOBER
From the Latin word octo, "eight," because this had been the eighth month of the early Roman calendar.

NOVEMBER
From the Latin word novem, "nine," because this had been the ninth month of the early Roman calendar.

DECEMBER
From the Latin word decem, "ten," because this had been the tenth month of the early Roman calendar.

Tuesday, March 1, 2011

HOW THE MONTHS GOT THEIR NAMES

This is a very interesting exercise in that many of us forgot that grade school Latin class when we learned the names of the months, or when we studied History, English, and Mythology in school, the stories of  Roman Gods were told.  In Art, Literature and civilization, we go by the Roman Julian Calendar- (collectively speaking used as a world wide standard).  We can start getting comfortable with dialog about Metaphysics by talking about something as mundane as the names of months.  No one can argue that beliefs in Pagan Gods/Goddesses are wicked or negatively label the subject, when they themselves use these words in the Western World everyday.
Below is a brief list to help trigger memory- haha.
We can accurately convert Roman dates after 58 BC relative to the start of the Julian calendar, precursor to the Gregorian calendar we use today.
Enjoy- Mimi

JANUARY
Named for the Roman God Janus, he was considered protector of gates and doorways. Janus is depicted with two faces, one looking into the past, the other facing the future. Janus is the God of new beginnings.


FEBRUARY
From the Latin word februa, meaning "to cleanse." The Roman Februalia was a month of purification and atonement.

MARCH
Named for the Roman God of war, Mars. This was the time of year to resume military campaigns that had been interrupted by winter.

APRIL
From the Latin word aperio, "to open (bud)," because plants begin to grow in this month.

MAY
Named for the Roman Goddess Maia, who oversaw the growth of plants. Also from the Latin word maiores, "elders," who were celebrated during this month.

JUNE
Named for the Roman Goddess Juno, patroness of marriage and the well-being of women. Also from the Latin word juvenis, "young people."

JULY
Named to honor Julius Caesar (100 B.C.– 44 B.C.). In 46 B.C., Julius Caesar made one of his greatest contributions to history: With the help of Sosigenes, he developed the Julian calendar, the precursor to the Gregorian calendar we use today.

AUGUST
Named to honor the first Roman emperor (and grandnephew of Julius Caesar), Augustus Caesar (63 B.C.– A.D. 14).

SEPTEMBER
From the Latin word septem, "seven," because this had been the seventh month of the early Roman calendar.

OCTOBER
From the Latin word octo, "eight," because this had been the eighth month of the early Roman calendar.

NOVEMBER
From the Latin word novem, "nine," because this had been the ninth month of the early Roman calendar.

DECEMBER
From the Latin word decem, "ten," because this had been the tenth month of the early Roman calendar.

March 1 - Today is Saint David's Day, the Patron Saint of Wales

St David for Wales
Saint David (St. Dewl)


Today people in Wales celebrate their Patron Saint- St. David.

(3) St David for Wales


His traditional emblem is the dove, and he appears here between figures representing the bardic tradition (harp, mistletoe and oak) and that of learning (book and lamp of learning). 
The work of Sir Edward Poynter

Individuals wear a Daffodil on this day in remembrance 

Mimi Pritchett Louiso: Link To Us @ The Rainforest Site

Mimi Pritchett Louiso: Link To Us @ The Rainforest Site: "Link To Us @ The Rainforest Site"